Welcome to Hordes of Models and Buckets of Dice

Fast and enjoyable rules for playing wargames battles in the Biblical, Ancient, Dark Ages, Mediveal, Italian Wars, Gunpowder Period, English Civil War , Renaissance, Seven Years War, American War of Independance, Napoleonic Wars, American Civil War, Franco Prussian War, Victorian Period Wars, The Great War, Interwar Years and Gangland wars, World War 2 and the Modern period.



Colts and Arrows


Very simple and quick rules for western skirmish.


Download for free


Colts and Arrows are very simple and quick western skirmish wargame rules, designed to be played in less than an hour. Game is played on squares. Each square is about 2” – 4” inches depending on the size of the models being used. Game is about collecting the most gold. The Character that has any hits left at the end of game and has the most gold is the winner. The rules fit on one side of A4.

Banter Battles


Free fast play wargame rules for a range of periods.


Download Core Rules & QRS


Banter Battles (BanBat) are a fast play set of rules that take a light-hearted approach to a range of wargaming periods. The rules are designed for social games and introducing new people of all ages into a very rewarding and interesting hobby. Banter Battles are designed to cover only two sides of A4 paper, but still can provide the depth and focus for a specific period. One side of A4 displays the common rules and concepts. The other side of the A4 contains the period specific QRS and any additional period rules. The rules use single models/bases make up a unit. A single base will represent a single man or several men. Distance is measured in a scale of a single base width and this width relates to an actual ground scale. The period being played will dictate the figure to men ratio and the distance scale relative to a single base width. The rules use a system of random move/activation selection by the players pulling coloured dice hidden in a bag.

Proelium


Download


Download Play Sheets Download Sample


The Proelium rules facilitate phalanx, warband, company to regimental level games from 3000BC to 1901AD with a focus on command and control. Larger games can be played depending of the scale and size of the table available. The design philosophy of the rule set provides a simple approach that can be used to play wargame battles, irrespective of the figure scale (6mm, 10mm, 15mm, 25mm and even 1/32 scale). These rules have been designed to provide the player with challenges based around the manoeuvre and the management of their army in an easy format while still maintaining a feel for the specific period being played. The rules use a number of bases, depending on the size of formations. These are then grouped into distinct command groups. A formation has between two, four or six bases to represent the different formation sizes. The bases are placed side by side to represent a line, skirmish line or a column/block deployment. A base can have any number of figures on it according to the players preference or current basing arrangement. To represent scouting or skirmish formations, the formation bases are spaced out in a line, with each base having a gap equal to one base width. I personally, use blank bases to show clear formation definition. Artillery formations are based slightly different. They are always on a single square base of two base widths wide to two base widths deep, always counting as a standard size formation. When playing with scales of 6mm – 28mm, a base size of 60mm x 60mm is used, although the equally popular 40mm wide bases could be used instead. For a scale greater than this, bases of 100mm x 100mm are used. This is the base size I use for my 54mm games. The rules use a measurement of one base width equal to one range/movement distance measurement. The rules have been designed to provide capability options for each base. These bases are then grouped into formations. Each formation cannot complete all of the traditional actions/phases (shooting, moving, charging and reforming etc.) during a turn, with a specific formation. Each formation has two action points per turn. The players then decide which combination of actions to complete. The players complete all actions on a specific formation alternatively. This makes the style of play more of a conversion, keeping players engaged through the whole game. The framework used in the game looks at the different formations capabilities compared to that of compatible enemy formations in period. Or put more simply: “Was the specific formation any better or worse on the battlefield compared to their opponents, for the period?”. This enables the player to apply their own knowledge of the historic period to represent the way they believe a specific type of formation would have performed.

Gunpowder


Download


The design philosophy of the Gunpowder rules provides a simple approach that can be used to play wargame battles at brigade or higher command levels, irrespective of the figure scale (6mm, 10mm, 15mm, 25mm and even 1/32 scale) with your own current models and common basing formats currently in use. There are many very good rule sets aimed at a specific period in the hobby which provide a detailed simulation of warfare in that period. These rules have been designed to provide the player with challenges based around the manoeuvre and the management of their units in a quick play format while still maintaining a feel for the period. An army within the game is typically 20 units as side broken down into distinct command groups. A unit is a single base. The rules use 100mm equal to one range/movement unit and a unit has a footprint of 120mm wide by 30mm – 80mm depth depending the formation and unit type. The rules have been designed to provide capability options at the unit level, while still presenting the dilemma to the player that they cannot complete all the traditional phases (shooting, moving, charging and reforming) during a turn with that specific unit. These rules instead of using a traditional system of very distinct detailed weapon factors and micro-managed movement rates, they provide a game framework that looks at the different unit’s capabilities compared to that of the unit’s opponents for the period. This enables the player to apply their own knowledge of the historic period to represent the way a specific unit should perform with in the game. The rules also do not use the IGUGO turn approach, but instead each action, (reform, charge, move and shoot) can be done in any sequence and up to twice in a turn. This keeps both players engaged throughout a turn sequence. A unit has a limit of two actions in any turn. The players take it in turns to complete these actions by unit. Also, the rules do not focus on detailed weapon factors and actions within a specific game turn time frame, but use the approach: “Was the specific unit any better or worse on the battlefield for the period?” For example, all units could have used volley fire, but was this specific unit any better/worse at than anyone else? The rules manage this through a unit being given a selection of capabilities. The rules make a difference between the plug and socket bayonets. This is handled by the unit completing a distinct action to counting them fitted. This means when a plug bayonet is fitted, the unit cannot shoot. This formation is called “Foot cavalry defence”. This also covers the use the of foot squares as an anti-cavalry defence. The rules have to make a comprise and when a unit is claiming “foot cavalry defence” they also count as a deep formation even when a unit is in line with bayonets fitted. All units break at the same point, regardless of if the unit is veteran, regular or militia. What is managed within the rule set is how quickly or slowly a unit reaches that point of failure. Generals are used for command and control only. Units must be organised into command groups. An army for the game is organised into a number of these command groups with an overall army commander. Generals can only command units within their group and the army commander can command any units across all command groups. Typically, a command group is a brigade, division or corps depending on the scale you have adopted for the army. Games can be played over a two-hour time limit with a scoring system based around the number of units that one side has managed to kill. The rules reward aggressive play; thus, hopefully avoiding a static game. For a specific historical battle use the objectives of the actual battle to decide the winner. These rules cover the period from the end of the dominance of the Swiss Keil to the end of The Mahdist Wars in the Sudan.

Download Play Sheets


Revolution and Webleys


Amazon Paperback (GBP) Amazon Paperback (USD)


Download Play Sheets

The Revolution and Webleys rule set provides a simple approach that can be used to play games irrespective of the figure scale (6mm, 10mm, 15mm, 25mm and even 1/32 scale). This is so that you can use your current collection of figures without any changes. The rules focus on command and control as opposed to a traditional approach of distinct and detailed weapon factors. By taking a light, very broad-brush approach, large games can be played in a few hours. Also, the rules allow for both skirmish and unit based games. The rules allow games from the Mahdist Wars in the Sudan until just before the start of World War 2. This period also includes the Boxer Revolution, Japans expansion into China. The Irish, Russian and Spanish Civil War’s. Additionally, the rules allow games for gangland and the revolutionary inter war years. The rules introduce chemical weapons, armoured trains and ground attack aircraft rules.


Machine Guns and Ballot Boxes


Amazon Paperback (GBP) Amazon Paperback (USD)


Download Play Sheets


The Machine Guns and Ballot Boxes rule set provides a simple approach that can be used to play games irrespective of the figure scale (6mm, 10mm, 15mm, 25mm and even 1/32 scale). This is so that you can use your current collection of figures without any changes. The rules focus on command and control as opposed to a traditional approach of distinct and detailed weapon factors. By taking a light, very broad-brush approach, large games can be played in a few hours. Also, the rules allow for both skirmish and unit based games. The rules allow games from the start of World War Two until present day warfare. Additionally, the rules allow games for insurgent warfare. Examples being: The Indochina Wars, Vietnam and the insurgent conflicts through the 1960's to the present day. The rules introduce airborne/air assaults, helicopters and smoke bombardments. Note: • Where bases, unit(s) is mentioned in the rules this also means model(s) for skirmish games. The phrase is inter-changeable. At-least one dice is always thrown and dice fractions are rounded up.